It’s already 2022 and we think it’ll take a while for us to let that sink in. As soon as a new year arrives, people tend to make several resolutions and set goals to achieve in the near future. This acts as a motivating factor for them as they believe in the concept of ‘New Year, New Me’. While in some cases, it is great to bring about a change for the betterment of oneself and one’s life, there are certain old habits that die hard. And as long as they aren’t harmful, why change them? We guess that’s what was on the mind of the chief economist of International Monetary Fund (IMF) when she took to Twitter to wish everyone a Happy New Year. 

Gita Gopinath, with her exceptional academic as well as intellectual abilities, has managed to become the first female chief economist, due to be raised to the position of Deputy Managing Director of IMF in December last year. Although she has always been known and talked about for her leadership qualities and immense contribution in the organization, it is her tweet that is creating a buzz this time. She recently took to her Twitter account to share a picture of herself with pani puri aka golgappa in one hand at an eatery. Here take a look. 

                Source: Gita Gopinath/Twitter

She captioned the picture saying, “Happy 2022! Gol Guppa aka Pani Puri to kick off the new year!” which created a rage among the netizens. A host of them filled the comments sections with their diverse views on the same. While some like @SanjayM73565536 remarked that since Gopinath lived in Kolkata in her early years of life, she could have called it puchka (the Bengali name for golgappa) instead of panipuri or golgappa. There were others who wrote a detailed comment explaining the inflation rates and estimating the cost of golgappas in the next 20 years. 

In the past few days, the tweet has garnered over 1k retweets and some 37k likes. Now that there has been so much talk about street food and even an NRI like Gopinath could not resist indulging in her desi cravings in the new year, why should we? 

Here are some delicious chaat recipes that you can devour at home. 

1.  Chana Chaat 

This super easy and quick chaat recipe can be prepared without much hassle. It not only works as a great party appetizer but also serves as a delicious evening snack. Boil the chickpeas, toss them in oil with some chopped onions, tomatoes, bellpeppers, cucumbers, green chilies and coriander leaves. Sprinkle salt and red chilli powder to taste and squeeze in some lime juice. Your wholesome chaat is ready. 

2.  Daulat Ki Chaat 

This is a slightly different kind of chaat. While our usual expectation from chaat is that it would be tangy and chatpati, this one is sweet and creamy. Popular across Uttar Pradesh where it is known as Makhan malai, this daulat ki chaat is a winter favourite in Delhi too. The best version of this milky and creamy delight can be found on the streets of Old Delhi. 

3.  Corn Chaat 

Bhutta aka corn is quite popular during the monsoon and winter months in India. Instead of biting into the corn, trying taking the kernels and sprucing them up into a chaat. Chaat masala, some red chilli powder, lime juice, chopped veggies of your choice and lime juice for the zest. Shake it all up and you can eat it right away. 

4.  Papdi Chaat 

This is the most traditional and classic chaat recipe that can be found in every nook and corner of North India. The papdi is placed on a plate and bathed in oodles of freshly whisked curd. This is topped with boiled potatoes, boiled chickpeas and pomegranate seeds. Sprinkle imly chutney, black pepper powder, salt and red chilli powder. Your refreshing chaat is ready. 

5.  Pasta Chaat 

Giving this Italian dish a desi makeover with all kinds of Indian spices added to the chaat. The boiled pasta is mixed with chilli powder, salt and chopped veggies like onions, tomatoes and coriander. Drizzle some oil so that they don’t stick and enjoy.