Raksi is a distilled alcoholic beverage that is manufactured at home in Nepal as well as in Sikkim, India. This unique drink, similar to gin or vodka, is made from millet, rice grains, barley, and distilled wheat. It is a culturally significant drink for Newars (Nepalese people) because it is frequently offered at celebrations, festivals, and gatherings, however most people say that they no longer wait for festivals to enjoy this traditional drink.  

It is particularly essential to them because of the antibacterial characteristics of the drink, and it is a part of their various religious rituals and social activities as well. Several studies on the drink have repeatedly proved that it contains medicinal ingredients that help in high altitude sickness.  

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This drink is often produced at home, and it gives a burning sensation in the throat on the first sip itself before transitioning to a pleasant and velvety feeling and taste. Raksi is generally served from a pitcher and is traditionally served in a 'bhatti glass' (particular glasses for serving Raksi). It's said to have around 45 percent alcohol content with an extremely strong flavour. Fermentation and distillation are used to prepare it. Though rice or wheat is generally used, people there occasionally add fruits and corn to make it taste a little different. Water and yeast are also used in the fermentation process in addition to these ingredients. 

 The entire process, including distillation, is carried out in a variety of copper and earthen(clay)pots. They use copper pots for this because it is a good heat conductor and helps to distribute heat uniformly throughout the pot, ensuring that the distillation process runs smoothly.  

This drink is also ranked 41st on CNN's list of the world's top 50 delicious drinks. This drink will become well-known quickly as a result of the praise and fame it has received. It's amazing to learn how a common ingredient, such as rice or barley grains are used to make alcoholic beverages. Drinks like these are becoming increasingly popular among many people nowadays. These lesser-known alcoholic beverages will undoubtedly compete with the widely available vodkas and whiskies. And, what's more surprising and amazing that these drinks are made at home in Nepal and Sikkim.